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LYMPHEDEMA LYMPHATIC SYSTEM FUNCTIONS

FUNCTIONS OF THE LYMPH OR LYMPATHIC SYSTEM

We all have about the lymph or lymphatic system, because a malfunction of this system is what causes this dreaded condition called lymphedema that we live and struggle with. But what exactly does the lymphatic system do?

Functions:

1. Helps to protect and maintain the fluid environment of the body by producing, filtering, and conveying lymph.

2. Transports processed fats from the intestinal system, proteins, enzymes, hormones and other substances into the blood system.

3. Restores 60% of the fluid that "leaks" out of the blood capillaries and cells into space between cells during normal metabolism.

4. Lymph nodes (part of the lymphatic system) produces new lymphocytes, which are critical to the immune system. The lymphatic system works with the thymus gland (lymph gland) and bone marrow in the production and transport of both "T" cells and "B" cells.

5. Lymph nodes play a crucial further role in body defense by filtering out micro-organisms, foreign substances, toxins.

This page will provide information and extensive links for further understanding of our lymph system.

Pat O'Connor

June 18, 2008

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ORGANS OF THE LYMPHATIC SYSTEM

Lymph channels - Lymph Nodes - Tonsils - Spleen - Adenoids - Thymus

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LYMPH SYSTEM
Provided by A.D.A.M.

Overview

Definition
A complex circulatory system composed of a network of organs, lymph nodes, lymph ducts, and lymph vessels that produce and transport lymph from tissues to the bloodstream. The lymphatic system is a major component of the body's immune system.
Information
Lymph is a clear-to-white fluid made of chyle (fluid from the intestines after digestion which contains proteins and fats), some red blood cells, and many white blood cells, especially lymphocytes. Lymphocytes are the cells that attack bacteria in the blood.

Lymph nodes are small, bean-shaped, soft nodules that are not usually visible or easily felt. They are located in clusters in various parts of the body, such as the neck, armpit, and groin. Lymph nodes produce lymphocytes, monocytes, and plasma cells. They also filter the lymph fluid and remove foreign material, such as bacteria and cancer cells. When bacteria are recognized in the lymph fluid, the lymph nodes enlarge as they produce and supply additional white blood cells to help fight infection.

The organs within the lymphatic system are the tonsils, adenoids, spleen, and thymus.

The lymphatic system filters fluid from around cells. It is an important part of the immune system. When people refer to swollen glands in the neck, they are usually referring to swollen lymph nodes. Common areas where lymph nodes can be easily felt, especially if they are enlarged, are: the groin, armpits (axilla), above the clavicle (supraclavicular), in the neck (cervical), and the back of the head just above hairline (occipital).

See also:

tonsillectomy
adenoidectomy
splenectomy
lymphoid hyperplasia
lymphangioma
lymphedema
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Lymph follicular hypertrophy
Provided by A.D.A.M.

Definition
Increased size of the lymph follicles. Lymph nodes act as filters keeping organisms, especially bacteria, from entering the bloodstream.See also lymphadenitis and lymphangitis.
Alternative names
Lymphadenopathy


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Lymphoid hyperplasia
Provided by A.D.A.M.

Definition
Proliferation of normal cells resembling lymph tissue.
Alternative names
Lymphoid hypertrophy


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Lymphatic obstruction
Provided by A.D.A.M.

Definition
Lymphatic obstruction involves blockage of the lymph vessels, which drain fluid from tissues throughout the body and allow immune cells to travel where they are needed.
Alternative names
Lymphedema

Causes, incidence, and risk factors
There are many causes of lymphatic obstruction, which is also known as lymphedema (swelling of the lymph passages). These include certain infections ( for example, chronic cellulitis or parasitic infections such as filariasis), trauma, tumors, certain surgeries, and radiation therapy. In addition, there are rare forms of congenital (present from birth) lymphedema which probably result from abnormalities in the development of the lymphatic vessels.

In Western societies, one of the most common causes of lymphedema is mastectomy with axillary dissection (removal of the breast and underarm lymph tissue for breast cancer). This can cause lymphedema of the arm in 10-15% of patients. This occurs because the lymphatic drainage of the arm passes through the axilla (armpit), and tissue in the axilla has been removed during mastectomy.

Recurrent cellulitis, or infection of the skin, can damage lymphatic vessels and lead to lymphedema of the affected area. This is more commonly seen in obese patients.

Symptoms
Chronic swelling, usually of the arm or leg, is the clinical hallmark of lymphatic obstruction.

Signs and tests
Physical exam and history are most important for diagnosis. In some cases, lymphangiography may be performed. This involves injection of dye into lymphatic vessels followed by X-rays of the area. Lymphangiography requires surgical isolation of the lymph vessels to be injected and is therefore a difficult procedure.

Lymphoscintigraphy is an alternative technique in which a radioactive substance that concentrates in the lymphatic vessels is injected into the affected tissue and mapped using a gamma camera, which images the location of the radioactive tracer. Lymphoscintigraphy is less invasive and more easily performed and is often used as a substitute for lymphangiography.

MRI is being explored as a means to image lymphatic vessels.

Last Reviewed: 7/24/2002 by James P. Dolan, M.D., Department of Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network.


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Lymphangiogram
Provided by A.D.A.M.

Definition
The lymphatic system is made up of lymph nodes and lymph vessels (lymphatics) that link the lymph nodes. The nodes harbor a type of white blood cell (lymphocytes) that helps fight infections. When an infection is present, the lymph nodes swell, help proliferate the white blood cells, and try to trap the organisms that are causing the infection. The lymph nodes also function to filter and trap cancer cells. The lymph nodes and vessels are not normally seen on an X-ray, so a contrast material and/or radioisotope (radioactive compound) is injected into the system to visualize it.
Alternative names
Lymphography; Lymphangiography

How the test is performed
The test is performed in a hospital radiology department or in the health care provider's office by an X-ray technician.

If leg or arm swelling is being evaluated, you may be offered a sedative to help relax. You will be put in a specially constructed chair or on the X-ray table. The skin of each foot is cleansed, and a small amount of blue dye is injected between the toes into the webbing.

Within 15 minutes, thin, bluish lines appear on the top of the foot. This identifies the lymphatics. Then, a local anesthetic is given and a small incision is made into one of the larger blue lines. A needle or catheter (a thin flexible tube) is inserted into a lymphatic channel in each foot, and a contrast medium is injected into each foot at a very slow rate (60 to 90 minutes for all the contrast medium to be injected).

A fluoroscope (a special X-ray machine that projects the images on a TV monitor) is used to follow the travels of the dye as it spreads through the lymphatic system up the legs, into the groin, and along the back of the abdominal cavity.

Once the contrast medium is injected, the catheter is removed, and the incisions are stitched and bandaged. X-rays are taken of the legs, pelvis, abdomen, and chest areas. The next day, another set of X-rays may be taken.

If a site of cancer (breast or melanoma) is being studied to evaluate spreading, a mixture of blue dye and a radioactive tracer is injected next to the mass. Special cameras detect the spread of tracer along lymph channels to outlying nodes.

A surgeon will then use the visible blue dye or radioactivity within nodes to guide biopsy within adjacent tissues (such as the axilla or arm pit for breast cancer) to determine possible routes of cancer spread.

How to prepare for the test
Inform the health care provider if you are pregnant, and if you have bleeding problems. Allergic reactions to X-ray contrast material or any iodine substance should be mentioned. You must sign a consent form. You may be asked to restrict your diet to clear liquids for a period of time before the test. You may wish to empty your bladder just before the test.

If you are undergoing lymphagiography for sentinel lymph node biopsy (in breast cancer and melanoma), you will need to prepare for the operating room. A surgeon and anesthesiologist will discuss how to prepare for the procedure.

Infants and children:

The physical and psychological preparation you can provide for this or any test or procedure depends on your child's age, interests, previous experiences, and level of trust. For specific information regarding how you can prepare your child, see the following topics as they correspond to your child's age:

infant test or procedure preparation (birth to 1 year)
toddler test or procedure preparation (1 to 3 years)
preschooler test or procedure preparation (3 to 6 years)
schoolage test or procedure preparation (6 to 12 years)
adolescent test or procedure preparation (12 to 18 years)

How the test will feel
There will be a brief sting from the needle and blue dye injected between the toes. There is another brief sting with the injection of the local anesthetic. There may be a feeling of pressure as the contrast medium is injected, and there may be some discomfort behind the knees and in the groin area.

The incisions will be sore for a few days. The blue dye will color the urine and stool for about 48 hours. The skin and possibly the vision will take on a bluish cast temporarily.

Risks
There is a possibility of an reaction to the contrast medium. An infection is possible at the site of the injection. The dye or contrast material may cause a fever and inflammation of the lymph vessels.

There is low radiation exposure. However, most experts feel that the risk of most X-rays is smaller than other risks we take every day. Pregnant women and children are more sensitive to the risks of the X-ray.

Why is the test done
The test, in conjunction with senitel lymph node biopsy, is used to evaluate the possible spread of cancers and the effectiveness of cancer therapy. The use of contrast and X-rays is used to help determine the cause of swelling in an arm or leg and check for parasitic (organisms that live on another) diseases.

Last Reviewed: 5/13/2002 by Evan Mair, M.D., Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network.


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Lymph node biopsy
Provided by A.D.A.M.

Definition
The lymphatic system is made up of lymph nodes and lymph vessels (lymphatic) that link the lymph nodes. The nodes make a type of white blood cell (lymphocytes) that fights infections. When an infection is present, the lymph nodes swell, produce white blood cells, and attempt to trap the organisms that are causing the infection. The lymph nodes also try to trap cancer cells. In this test, a lymph node or a piece of a lymph node is removed for examination under a microscope.
Alternative names
Biopsy - lymph nodes

How the test is performed
The test is done in the hospital. There are 2 ways the sample may be obtained: a needle biopsy or an open biopsy. A needle biopsy involves inserting a needle into a node to obtain the sample. You will be asked to lie on the examination table. The biopsy site will be cleansed, and a local anesthetic will be injected. The biopsy needle is then inserted into the node. A sample is removed, pressure is applied to the site to stop the bleeding, and a bandage is applied.

An open biopsy consists of surgically removing a part or all of a node. You will be asked to lie on the examination table. The skin over the biopsy site is cleansed, and a local anesthetic is injected (occasionally, a general anesthetic is given). A small incision is made and the entire lymph node or a part of the lymph node is removed. The incision is then closed with stitches and bandaged. The biopsy is then sent to the laboratory for examination.

How to prepare for the test
Adults:

Tell your health care provider about any drug allergies, which medications you are taking, if you have bleeding problems, and if you are pregnant. You must sign a consent form.

Infants and children:

The physical and psychological preparation you can provide for this or any test or procedure depends on your child's age, interests, previous experience, and level of trust. For specific information regarding how you can prepare your child, see the following topics as they correspond to your child's age:

infant test or procedure preparation (birth to 1 year)
toddler test or procedure preparation (1 to 3 years)
preschooler test or procedure preparation (3 to 6 years)
schoolage test or procedure preparation (6 to 12 years)
adolescent test or procedure preparation (12 to 18 years)
How the test will feel
When the local anesthetic is injected, there will be a prick and a mild stinging. The biopsy site will be tender for a few days after the test.

Risks
There is a small chance of infection or bleeding. Additionally, there is a moderate risk of nerve injury and local paralysis or numbness when the biopsy is on a lymph node close to nerves.

Why is the test done
The test is used to help determine the cause of lymph node enlargement (swollen glands). It can also determine whether tumors in the lymph node are cancerous or noncancerous.

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Lymphadenitis and lymphangitis
Provided by A.D.A.M.

Definition
An infection of the lymph nodes (glands) and lymph channels.
Alternative names
Lymph node infection; Lymph gland infection; Localized lymphadenopathy

Causes, incidence, and risk factors
The lymphatic system is a network of vessels (channels), nodes (glands) and organs. It functions as part of the immune system to protect against and fight infection, inflammation, and cancers. It also functions in the transport of fluids, fats, proteins, and other substances within the body. The lymph glands, or lymph nodes, are small structures that filter the lymph fluid. There are many white blood cells in the lymph nodes to help fight infection.

Lymphadenitis and lymphangitis are common complications of bacterial infections. Lymphadenitis involves inflammation of the lymph glands. This may occur if the glands are overwhelmed by bacteria, virus, fungi, or other organisms and infection develops within the glands. It may also occur as a result of circulating cancer cells or other inflammatory conditions. The location of the affected gland(s) is usually associated with the site of the underlying infection, tumor, or inflammation. It commonly is a result of a cellulitis or other bacteria infection (usually infection by streptococci or staphylococci).

Lymphangitis involves the lymph vessels/channels, with inflammation of the channel and resultant pain and systemic and localized symptoms. It commonly results from an acute streptococcal or staphylococcal infection of the skin (cellulitis), or from an abscess in the skin or soft tissues. Lymphangitis may suggest that an infection is progressing, and should raise concerns of spread of bacteria to the bloodstream, which can cause life-threatening infections. Lymphangitis may be confused with a clot in a vein (thrombophlebitis).

Prevention
Good general health and hygiene are helpful in the prevention of any infection.

Symptoms

LYMPHADENITIS

lymph nodes may be swollen, tender, and hard
lymph nodes feel smooth or irregular to touch, or soft and "rubbery" (fluctuant) if an abscess has formed
the skin over a node may be reddened and hot

LYMPHANGITIS

red streaks from infected area to the armpit or groin
may be faint or obvious
throbbing pain along the affected area (common)
may involve the lymph nodes (see above)
fever of 100 to 104 degrees Fahrenheit and/or chills
individuals may have a general ill feeling (malaise), with loss of appetite, headache, and muscle aches
Signs and tests
An examination shows affected lymph nodes and/or lymph vessels and may indicate the cause. The health care provider may look for evidence of trauma around enlarged or swollen nodes.

A biopsy and culture of the affected area or node may reveal the cause of the inflammation. Blood cultures may reveal spread of infection to the bloodstream

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Lymphogranuloma venereum
Provided by A.D.A.M.

Definition
LGV is a sexually-transmitted disease (STD) caused by the bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis that causes inflammation and drainage of certain lymph nodes, and destruction and scarring of surrounding tissue.
Alternative names
LGV; Lymphogranuloma inguinale; Lymphopathia venereum

Causes, incidence, and risk factors
Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is caused by 3 subtypes of C. trachomatis and which are different organisms from the subtypes that cause eye disease, blindness, and the more common genital chlamydia.

LGV is more common in Central and South America than in North America. People with LGV can begin to have symptoms few days to a month after becoming infected.

The disease starts as a painless ulcer on the male genitalia or in the female genital tract. As the organism spreads, the inguinal (groin) lymph nodes swell, become tender, and may rupture and drain through the skin. These enlarged nodes are called buboes.

The skin above the lymph node is often swollen (edematous) and red. These areas may appear to heal, but the patient will have repeated episodes of lymph node swelling and drainage. The patient may also have systemic signs including fever, decreased appetite, and malaise.

In people who practice anal intercourse, the disease can also affect the lymph nodes around the rectum (perirectal). This is often accompanied by bloody rectal discharge, painful defecation (tenesmus), diarrhea, and lower abdominal pain. Women may develop fistulas (connections) between the vagina and rectum.

There are a few thousands cases of LGV each year in the US. The main risk factor is having multiple sexual partners.

Prevention
Abstinence is the only absolute way to prevent sexually transmitted disease. Safer sex behaviors may reduce the risk. A monogamous sexual relationship with a person known to be free of any STD is advisable.

The use of condoms, either the male or female type, markedly decreases the likelihood of contracting a sexually-transmitted disease but they must be used properly. The condom should be in place from the beginning to end of sexual activity and should be used EVERY time the person engages in sexual activity with a non-monogamous or other suspect partner.

Condoms are effective and inexpensive considering the consequences of contracting a sexually transmitted disease.

Symptoms

Small painless ulcer on genitalia
Swelling and redness of the skin over the inguinal lymph nodes
Swollen groin (inguinal) lymph nodes on one or both sides
Drainage from inguinal lymph nodes
Drainage of blood or pus from the rectum (blood in the stools)
Pain while having a bowel movement (tenesmus)
Signs and tests
The medical history and physical examination may show:

A history of sexual contact with a person having lymphogranuloma venereum
An ulcer on an affected person's genitals
A perianal fistula with drainage
Inguinal lymph node enlargement (inguinal lymphadenopathy)
Drainage from inguinal lymph nodes
Tests:
Biopsy of the node (chlamydia seen after staining)
Culture of a node aspirate for chlamydia (a needle is inserted into the lymph node and fluid is pulled out of the node)
Indirect immunofluorescence for chlamydia
Serology test for LGV is the most useful


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WHAT IS LYMPH FLUID?

First of all, lymph is important - as important as blood or oxygen. While loss of the lymph system would not be as immediately fatal, it would be fatal nonetheless - in less than 72 hours. Lymph is blood plasma after it has carried its nutrients into the body's tissues, dropped them off for the cells, picked up our metabolic wastes, and re-entered our water reclamation plant, which is the lymph system. Once it has passed through a series of nodes, where it is filtered and detoxified, lymph empties back into the heart where it once again becomes blood plasma.

Keeping the lymph system active is therefore extremely important - the faster we detoxify, the healthier we are. Lymph drainage is always indicated in cases of lymphedema. These can arise following surgery, trauma, or infection. Facial drainage helps with sinusitis and dental problems and is excellent for the skin - even providing a one or two day "face lift." Lymph drainage hydrates the skin and removes local toxins, softening wrinkles, rejuvenating the skin, and helping to heal acne. It is of particular benefit in clearing cellulite. Drainage also promotes healing, toning, and revitalizing of the internal organs, benefiting irritable bowel syndrome, constipation, Crohn's disease, diverticulosis, gastritis, and chronic pancreatic insufficiency. These are but a few of the benefits - the list goes on almost endlessly.

Mostly lymph is water - about 96%. It is also rich in minerals, about the same as seawater, as well as proteins and white blood cells. All together these make up the other 4%. Lymph is the clear fluid you see seeping out of a scrape or shallow cut, often before there is any blood. The bulk of our lymph fluid circulates just beneath the skin, where it is quickly available as the immune system's first line of defense and the body's first response to minor injuries.

Our bodies are about 50% water by weight. Of this, about 30% is lymph. The rest is blood plasma, interstitial fluid (in the tissues), and cerebral spinal fluid. By volume, our bodies contain about three times as much lymph as they do blood. But because lymph is clear (the root word is "limpa," meaning limpid, clear), the vessels that carry it are difficult to see. Thus, it was not really discovered until 1622, when Gasparo Aselli dissected a dog that had just eaten a meal high in fat, temporarily making the largest vessels visible as "milky veins."

Another way of thinking about the lymph system is to consider it a scavenging system for interstitial fluid. If it fails, even partially, this fluid is not sufficiently collected and the result is an area of swelling known as edema. If it fails altogether, the entire body swells and bloats until the toxic overload becomes too great for life to continue. Too keep it healthy requires drinking plenty of water and exercising, especially swimming and stretching and rhythmic movements. Of course, a good session of lymph drainage does not hurt.


http://www.houseofhealinghands.com/lymph.html

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Lymph system

Definition  

The lymph system is a network of organs, lymph nodes, lymph ducts, and lymph vessels that produce and transport lymph from tissues to the bloodstream. The lymph system is a major component of the body's immune system. 

Information    

Lymph is a clear-to-white fluid made of:

Lymph nodes are small, bean-shaped, soft nodules. They are not usually visible or easily felt. They are located in clusters in various parts of the body, such as the neck, armpit, and groin.

Lymph nodes produce immune cells (such as lymphocytes, monocytes, and plasma cells). They also filter the lymph fluid and remove foreign material, such as bacteria and cancer cells. When bacteria are recognized in the lymph fluid, the lymph nodes enlarge as they produce additional white blood cells to help fight infection.

The organs within the lymphatic system are the tonsils, adenoids, spleen, and thymus.

See also:

Update Date: 5/6/2003

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002247.htm

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Lymph Drainage Massage

*Note this is NOT treatment for lymphedema*

http://www.deeptissue.com/articles/lymphatic_article.html

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LYMPHATIC SYSTEM AND IMMUNITY

http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/BIOBK/BioBookIMMUN.html


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Lymphoma Information Network

The Lymphatic System

http://www.lymphomainfo.net/lymphoma/lymphsys.html

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The Peripheral Lymph System

Columbia University

*Outstanding Article*

http://cpmcnet.columbia.edu/student/ssn/histology/lymph_slides.pdf


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The Lymphatic System

Lymphoid Organs

http://library.thinkquest.org/3007/lymphatic.html


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Lymph System - Tonsils and Adenoids

http://www.health-first.org/health_info/your_health_first/kids/tonsils_adenoids.cfm


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Spleen and Lymphatic System

http://kidshealth.org/parent/general/body_basics/spleen_lymphatic.html

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diagram of the lymph system

diagram of upper lymph system

diagram of lower lymph system

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Join us as we work for lymphedema patients everywhere:

Advocates for Lymphedema

Dedicated to be an advocacy group for lymphedema patients. Working towards education, legal reform, changing insurance practices, promoting research, reaching for a cure.

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/AdvocatesforLymphedema/

Subscribe: AdvocatesforLymphedema-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Pat O'Connor

Lymphedema People / Advocates for Lymphedema

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For information about Lymphedema

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=lymphedema\

For Information about Lymphedema Complications

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=complications_of_lymphedema

For Lymphedema Personal Stories

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/phpBB2/viewforum.php?f=3

For information about How to Treat a Lymphedema Wound

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=how_to_treat_a_lymphedema_wound

For information about Lymphedema Treatment 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=treatment

For information about Exercises for Lymphedema 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=exercises_for_lymphedema

For information on Infections Associated with Lymphedema

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=infections_associated_with_lymphedema

For information on Lymphedema in Children

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=lymphedema_in_children

Lymphedema Glossary

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=glossary:listing

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Lymphedema People - Support Groups

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Children with Lymphedema

The time has come for families, parents, caregivers to have a support group of their own. Support group for parents, families and caregivers of chilren with lymphedema. Sharing information on coping, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. Sponsored by Lymphedema People.

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/childrenwithlymphedema/

Subscribe: childrenwithlymphedema-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

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Lipedema Lipodema Lipoedema

No matter how you spell it, this is another very little understood and totally frustrating conditions out there. This will be a support group for those suffering with lipedema/lipodema. A place for information, sharing experiences, exploring treatment options and coping.

Come join, be a part of the family!

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/lipedema_lipodema_lipoedema/?yguid=209645515

Subscribe: lipedema_lipodema_lipoedema-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

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MEN WITH LYMPHEDEMA

If you are a man with lymphedema; a man with a loved one with lymphedema who you are trying to help and understand come join us and discover what it is to be the master instead of the sufferer of lymphedema.

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/menwithlymphedema/

Subscribe: menwithlymphedema-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

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All About Lymphangiectasia

Support group for parents, patients, children who suffer from all forms of lymphangiectasia. This condition is caused by dilation of the lymphatics. It can affect the intestinal tract, lungs and other critical body areas.

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/allaboutlymphangiectasia/

Subscribe: allaboutlymphangiectasia-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

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Lymphatic Disorders Support Group @ Yahoo Groups

While we have a number of support groups for lymphedema... there is nothing out there for other lymphatic disorders. Because we have one of the most comprehensive information sites on all lymphatic disorders, I thought perhaps, it is time that one be offered.

DISCRIPTION

Information and support for rare and unusual disorders affecting the lymph system. Includes lymphangiomas, lymphatic malformations, telangiectasia, hennekam's syndrome, distichiasis, Figueroa
syndrome, ptosis syndrome, plus many more. Extensive database of information available through sister site Lymphedema People.

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/lymphaticdisorders/

Subscribe: lymphaticdisorders-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

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Lymphedema People New Wiki Pages

Have you seen our new “Wiki” pages yet?  Listed below are just a sample of the more than 140 pages now listed in our Wiki section. We are also working on hundred more.  Come and take a stroll! 

Lymphedema Glossary 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=glossary:listing 

Lymphedema 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=lymphedema 

Arm Lymphedema  

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=arm_lymphedema 

Leg Lymphedema 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=leg_lymphedema 

Acute Lymphedema 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=acute_lymphedema 

The Lymphedema Diet 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=the_lymphedema_diet 

Exercises for Lymphedema  

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=exercises_for_lymphedema 

Diuretics are not for Lymphedema 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=diuretics_are_not_for_lymphedema 

Lymphedema People Online Support Groups 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=lymphedema_people_online_support_groups 

Lipedema 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=lipedema 

Treatment 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=treatment 

Lymphedema and Pain Management 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=lymphedema_and_pain_management 

Manual Lymphatic Drainage (MLD) and Complex Decongestive Therapy (CDT)

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=manual_lymphatic_drainage_mld_complex_decongestive_therapy_cdt 

Infections Associated with Lymphedema 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=infections_associated_with_lymphedema 

How to Treat a Lymphedema Wound 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=how_to_treat_a_lymphedema_wound 

Fungal Infections Associated with Lymphe dema 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=fungal_infections_associated_with_lymphedema 

Lymphedema in Children 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=lymphedema_in_children 

Lymphoscintigraphy 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=lymphoscintigraphy 

Magnetic Resonance Imaging 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=magnetic_resonance_imaging 

Extraperitoneal para-aortic lymph node dissection (EPLND) 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=extraperitoneal_para-aortic_lymph_node_dissection_eplnd 

Axillary node biopsy 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=axillary_node_biopsy

Sentinel Node Biopsy 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=sentinel_node_biopsy

Small Needle Biopsy - Fine Needle Aspiration 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=small_needle_biopsy 

Magnetic Resonance Imaging 

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=magnetic_resonance_imaging 

Lymphedema Gene FOXC2

 http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=lymphedema_gene_foxc2

 Lymphedema Gene VEGFC

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=lymphedema_gene_vegfc

 Lymphedema Gene SOX18

 http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=lymphedema_gene_sox18

 Lymphedema and Pregnancy

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com/wiki/doku.php?id=lymphedema_and_pregnancy

Home page: Lymphedema People

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Page Updated: Dec. 29, 2011