Massage Therapy Definitions by State Boards

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Massage Therapy Definitions by State Boards

Postby patoco » Sun Jun 11, 2006 9:37 pm

Massage Therapy Definitions by State Boards

Our Home Page: Lymphedema People

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com

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Special thanks to Bob Weiss for this information. Gives a definition of what exactly massage therapy is on a state by state basis.

Thought it would be interesting to share.

Pat

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Definitions of Massage and Bodywork
as defined by each state board.

Alabama CINS
Massage Therapist
Description:

Massage therapists work to alleviate pain, relieve stress, and improve the health and well being of their clients by the mobilization of the soft tissue including skin, muscles, tendons, ligaments, and connective tissue. Massage therapy is defined as the manual manipulation or mobilization to affect normalization of the soft tissue of the human body. Massage therapists may include adjunctive therapies such as hydrotherapy, mild abrasives, heliotherapy, or topical preparations not classified as prescription drugs, mechanical devices and tools that mimic or enhance manual actions, and instructed self care. Massage therapy may be provided in response to a physicians prescription or in conjunction with other therapeutic modalities.

Alabama Board of Massage Therapy
Keith Warren
660 Adams Ave., Suite 301
Montgomery, Alabama 36104
Telephone: 334-269-9990
FAX: 334-263-6115

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Arkansas State Board of Massage Therapy

103 Airways
Hot Springs, Arkansas 71903-0739
Phone: (501) 623-0444

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Department of Public Health, Massage Therapy Licensure, 410 Capitol Avenue, MS# 12APP, PO Box 340308, Hartford, CT 06134-0308

Website Information: www.dph.state.ct.us/

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Delaware Code

TITLE 24
Professions and Occupations
CHAPTER 53. MASSAGE AND BODYWORK
Subchapter I. Board of Massage and Bodywork
Massage and bodywork therapist" shall mean a person who represents himself or herself to the public by any title or description of services incorporating the words "bodywork," "massage," "massage therapist," "massage therapy," "massage practitioner," "massagist," "masseur," "masseuse," or who engages in the practice of massage and bodywork for a fee, monetary or otherwise.

"Massage technician" shall mean a person, who is certified with the Board to perform certain functions within the practice of massage therapy, and who is authorized by the Board to use any title or description of services incorporating the words "bodywork," "massage," "massage practitioner," "massagist," "masseur," "masseuse," or certified massage technician" but shall be prohibited from using the words "therapist" or "therapy."

Practice of massage and bodywork" shall mean a system of structured touch applied to the superficial or deep tissue, muscle, or connective tissue, by applying pressure with manual means. Such application may include, but is not limited to, friction, gliding, rocking, tapping, kneading, or nonspecific stretching, whether or not aided by massage oils or the application of hot and cold treatments. The practice of massage and bodywork is designed to promote general relaxation, enhance circulation, improve joint mobilization and/or relieve stress and muscle tension, and to promote a general sense of well-being.

The practice of massage and bodywork excludes actions by any person, who is certified or licensed in this State by any other law, and who is engaged in the profession or occupation for which he or she is certified or licensed, and actions by any person engaged in an occupation which does not require a certificate or certification, including, but not limited to, physical education teachers, athletic coaches, health or recreation directors, instructors at health clubs or spas, martial arts, water safety and dance instructors, or coaches and practitioners of techniques, who are acting within the scope of activity for which they are trained, or students of massage who are practicing within the scope of their course of study.

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Florida

"Massage" means the manipulation of the soft tissues of the human body with the hand, foot, arm, or elbow, whether or not such manipulation is aided by hydrotherapy, including colonic irrigation, or thermal therapy; any electrical or mechanical device; or the application to the human body of a chemical or herbal preparation.

(4) "Massage therapist" means a person licensed as required by this act, who administers massage for compensation.

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Hawaii

Amended 697

1 "Massage", "massage therapy", and "Hawaiian massage" commonly known as lomilomi, means any method of treatment of the superficial soft parts of the body, consisting of rubbing, stroking, tapotement, pressing, shaking, or kneading with the hands, feet, elbow, or arms, and whether or not aided by any mechanical or electrical apparatus, appliances, or supplementary aids such as rubbing alcohol, liniments, antiseptics, oils, powder, creams, lotions, ointments, or other similar preparations commonly used in this practice. Any mechanical or electrical apparatus used as described in this chapter shall be approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration.

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IOWA

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LOUISIANA

"Massage therapy" means the manipulation of soft tissue for the purpose of maintaining good health and establishing and maintaining good physical condition. The term shall include effleurage (stroking), petrissage (kneading), tapotement (percussion), compression, vibration, friction, (active/passive range of motion), Shiatsu, and acupressure, either by hand, forearm, elbow, foot, or with mechanical appliances for the purpose of body massage. Massage therapy may include the use of lubricants such as salts, powders, liquids, creams, (with the exception of prescriptive or medicinal creams), heat lamps, whirlpool, hot and cold pack, salt glow, or steam cabinet baths. It shall not include electrotherapy, laser therapy, microwave, colonic therapy, injection therapy, or manipulation of the joints. Equivalent terms for massage therapy are massage, therapeutic massage, massage technology, Shiatsu, body work, or any derivation of those terms. As used in this Chapter,the terms "therapy" and "therapeutic" shall not include diagnosis, the treatment of illness or disease, or any service or procedure for which a license to practice medicine, chiropractic, physical therapy, or podiatry is required by law.

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Maine

Massage therapist means a person licensed by the Department of Professional and Financial Regulation, who provides or offers to provide massage therapy for a fee, monetary or otherwise. Massage therapy means a scientific or skillful manipulation of soft tissue for therapeutic or remedial purposes, specifically for improving muscle tone and circulation and promoting health and physical well-being. The term includes, but is not limited to, manual and mechanical procedures for the purpose of treating soft tissue only, the use of supplementary aids such as rubbing alcohol, liniments, oils, antiseptics, powders, herbal preparations, creams or lotions, procedures such as oil rubs, salt glows and hot or cold packs or other similar procedures or preparations commonly used in this practice. This term specifically excludes manipulation of the spine or articulations and excludes sexual contact as defined in Title 17-A, section 251, subsection 1, paragraph D.

Massage therapy. "Massage therapy" means a scientific or skillful manipulation of soft tissue for therapeutic or remedial purposes, specifically for improving muscle tone and circulation and promoting health and physical well-being. The term includes, but is not limited to, manual and mechanical procedures for the purpose of treating soft tissue only, the use of supplementary aids such as rubbing alcohol, liniments, oils, antiseptics, powders, herbal preparations, creams or lotions, procedures such as oil rubs, salt glows and hot or cold packs or other similar procedures or preparations commonly used in this practice. This term specifically excludes manipulation of the spine or articulations and excludes sexual contact as defined in Title 17-A, section 251, subsection 1, paragraph D. [1991, c. 548, Pt. E (amd).]

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Maryland

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Mississippi

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Missouri

"Massage therapy", a health care profession which involves the treatment of the body's tonus system through the scientific or skillful touching, rubbing, pressing or other movements of the soft tissues of the body with the hands, forearms, elbows, or feet, or with the aid of mechanical apparatus, for relaxation, therapeutic, remedial or health maintenance purposes to enhance the mental and physical well-being of the client, but does not include the prescription of medication, spinal or joint manipulation, the diagnosis of illness or disease, or any service or procedure for which a license to practice medicine, chiropractic, physical therapy, or podiatry is required by law, or to those occupations defined in chapter 329, RSMo

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Nebraska

Massage therapy shall mean the physical, mechanical, or electrical manipulation of soft tissue for the therapeutic purposes of enhancing muscle relaxation, reducing stress, improving circulation, or instilling a greater sense of well-being and may include the use of oil, salt glows, heat lamps, and hydrotherapy. Massage therapy shall not include diagnosis or treatment or use of procedures for which a license to practice medicine or surgery, chiropractic, or podiatry is required nor the use of microwave diathermy, shortwave diathermy, ultrasound, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, electrical stimulation of over thirty-five volts, neurological hyperstimulation, or spinal and joint adjustments; and

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New Hampshire

Description:
Massage clients and administer other body conditioning treatments to promote, maintain, or restore health and well-being. Apply alcohol, lubricants, or other rubbing compounds. Massage body using hands or vibrating equipment. Related job titles include: massage therapist, bodywork practitioner, bodyworker, muscle therapist, massotherapist, or somatic therapist practitioner.

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New York

Definition of Practice of Massage Therapy - Education Law, section 7801

The practice of the profession of massage therapy is defined as engaging in applying a scientific system of activity to the muscular structure of the human body by means of stroking, kneading, tapping and vibrating with the hands or vibrators for the purpose of improving muscle tone and circulation.

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New Mexico

"Massage Therapy" means the assessment and treatment of soft tissues and their dysfunctions for

therapeutic purposes as defined in the Massage Therapy Practice Act, NMSA 1978, Section 61-12C-3.E.

(1) The treatment of soft tissues is the repetitive deformation of soft tissues from more than one anatomical point by manual or mechanical means to accomplish homeostasis and/or pain relief in the tissues being deformed;

(a) "soft tissue" includes skin, adipose, muscle and myofascial tissues;

(b) "manual" means by use of hands or body;

(c) "mechanical" means any tool or device that mimics or enhances the actions possible by the hands; and

(d) "deformation" specifically prohibits the use of high velocity thrust techniques used in joint manipulations.

(2) The practice of Massage Therapy applies to Shiatsu, Tui Na, and Rolfing.

(3) The practice of Massage Therapy DOES NOT apply to the practice of: Craniosacral, Feldenkrais, Polarity Therapy, Reiki, Foot and Hand Reflexology (without the use of creams, oils, or mechanical tools), and Trager

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OHIO

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North Carolina

Massage and bodywork therapy. -- Systems of activity applied to the soft tissues of the human body for therapeutic, educational, or relaxation purposes. The application may include:
a. Pressure, friction, stroking, rocking, kneading, percussion, or passive or active stretching within the normal anatomical range of movement.
b. Complementary methods, including the external application of water, heat, cold, lubricants, and other topical preparations.
c. The use of mechanical devices that mimic or enhance actions that may possibly be done by the hands.
(4) Massage and bodywork therapist. -- A person licensed under this Article.
(5) Practice of massage and bodywork therapy. -- The application of massage and bodywork therapy to any person for a fee or other consideration. "Practice of massage and bodywork therapy" does not include the diagnosis of illness or disease, medical procedures, chiropractic adjustive procedures, electrical stimulation, ultrasound, prescription of medicines, or the use of modalities for which a license to practice medicine, chiropractic, nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, acupuncture, or podiatry is required by law.

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Rhode Island

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South Carolina

The General Assembly recognizes that the practice of massage/bodywork is potentially harmful to the public in that massage/bodywork therapists must have a knowledge of anatomy, kinesiology, and physiology and an understanding of the relationship between the structure and the function of the tissues being treated and the total function of the body. Massage/bodywork is therapeutic, and regulations are necessary to protect the public from unqualified practitioners. It is, therefore, necessary in the interest of public health, safety, and welfare to regulate the practice of massage/bodywork in this State. However, restrictions must be imposed to the extent necessary to protect the public from significant and discernible danger to health and yet not in such a manner which will unreasonably affect the competitive market. Further, consumer protection for both health and economic matters must be afforded the public through legal remedies provided for in this chapter.

Massage/bodywork therapy" means the application of a system of structured touch of the superficial tissues of the human body with the hand, foot, arm, or elbow whether or not the structured touch is aided by hydrotherapy, thermal therapy, a massage device, human hands, or the application to the human body of an herbal preparation.

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Texas

"Massage therapy" means the manipulation of soft tissue by hand or through a mechanical or electrical apparatus for the purpose of body massage and includes effleurage (stroking), petrissage (kneading), tapotement (percussion), compression, vibration, friction, nerve strokes, and Swedish gymnastics. The terms "massage," "therapeutic massage," "massage technology," myotherapy," "body massage," "body rub," or any derivation of those terms are synonyms for "massage therapy." Practices in massage therapy include the use of oil, salt glows, heat lamps, hot and cold packs, and tub, shower, or cabinet baths. Massage therapy constitutes a health care service if the massage therapy is for therapeutic purposes. Massage therapy does not constitute the practice of chiropractic. The terms therapy and therapeutic when used in the context of massage therapy practice do not include (1) the diagnosis or treatment of illness or disease; or (2) a service or procedure for which a license to practice medicine, chiropractic, physical therapy, or podiatry is required by law.

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UTAH

"Practice of massage therapy" means:
(a)the examination, assessment, and evaluation of the soft tissue structures of the body for the purpose of devising a treatment plan to promote homeostasis;
(b) the systematic manual or mechanical manipulation of the soft tissue of the body for the therapeutic purpose of:
(i) promoting the health and well-being of a client;
(ii) enhancing the circulation of the blood and lymph;
(iii) relaxing and lengthening muscles;
(iv) relieving pain;
(v) restoring metabolic balance; and
(vi) achieving homeostasis;
(c) the use of the hands or a mechanical or electrical apparatus in connection with this Subsection (6);
(d) the use of rehabilitative procedures involving the soft tissue of the body;
(e) range of motion or movements without spinal adjustment as set forth in

Section 58-73-102;

(f) oil rubs, heat lamps, salt glows, hot and cold packs, or tub, shower, steam, and cabinet baths;
(g) manual traction and stretching exercise;
(h) correction of muscular distortion by treatment of the soft tissues of the body;
(i) counseling, education, and other advisory services to reduce the incidence and severity of physical disability, movement dysfunction, and pain;
(j) similar or related activities and modality techniques; and
(k) the practice described in this Subsection (6) on an animal to the extent permitted by:(i) Subsection 58-28-8(12);
(ii) the provisions of this chapter; and
(iii) division rule.
patoco
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