Lymphedema Arm Exercises

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Lymphedema Arm Exercises

Postby patoco » Sun Jun 11, 2006 8:25 pm

Lymphedema Arm Exercises

Our Home Page: Lymphedema People

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com

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Light Arm Exercises That Can Help Prevent/Manage Lymphedema

Because light exercise after breast cancer surgery and lymph node removal can help reduce the chances of lymphedema, patients should discuss how and when to begin arm exercises. Some patients find that taking painkillers (analgesics) 30 minutes prior to exercising helps alleviate discomfort, although all medications should be approved by the patient’s physician.

The following are suggestions of exercises following breast cancer surgery from the not allowed Cancer Trust, an independent charity that provides information and support to patients with cancer. Each exercise may be performed five times in a row, three times a day (morning, afternoon, evening) with the physician’s approval.

With palms up and elbows straight, stretch arms high above head, linking fingers together.

Bend elbows and clasp hands at the back of the neck. Push elbows out as far as possible and then bring them together to touch in front of the body. Repeat.

Place hands behind the back and lace fingers together. Slide hands as far as possible up the body toward the neck.

Place hands on shoulders (on the same side of the body) and move elbows up and then down toward the sides of the body.

Place hands on shoulders and make circular movements with the elbows.

Circles should be as large as possible. Change directions periodically.

After breast stitches have been removed, stand with one foot in front of the other. Hold on to a chair or table. Lean forward and swing the arm that was involved in the surgery backwards and forwards, and then from side to side as far as it will go. Hold a small weight to gain momentum. Increase movement until arm reaches shoulder height. Keep elbows straight.

Stand with one foot in front of one another. Hold onto a chair or table for support. Lean forward and swing the arm on the side of the surgery in circles, first clockwise and then counter-clockwise. Keep elbows straight.
Face toward a wall. Place hands on the wall and inch fingers up the wall. Try to go higher each day until arms are fully straight over head.

http://imaginis.com/breasthealth/lymphedema.asp

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Exercise and Arm Lymphedema

Nicole L. Gergich MPT, MLD/CDT
Lymphedema Specialist, Penn Therapy and Fitness
Posting Date: May 6, 2001
Last Modified: January 3, 2002
Why Should I Exercise?

One very important component of a comprehensive treatment plan for cancer-related lymphedema is exercise. A program consisting of flexibility, strengthening and aerobic exercise is beneficial in reducing lymphedema when administered under the correct conditions. Exercise also allows cancer survivors a more active role in their own lymphedema management. Recent studies have shown no significant increase in the incidence of lymphedema after breast cancer, between women participating in an exercise program when compared to women who did not exercise.

What Type of Exercises are Helpful To Someone with Lymphedema?

Flexibility exercises help to maintain joint range of motion and allow for elongation or stretching of tissues. Flexibility exercises also help to prevent joint stiffness and postural changes after cancer surgeries or treatments. Muscle tightness may further complicate lymphedema.

Strengthening exercises are also important in reducing lymphedema when done at low intensity levels with the extremity wrapped (see below). These exercises often help increase lymphatic and venous flow, aiding in the removal of fluid from the involved extremity.

Aerobic exercise enhances the lymphatic and venous flow, further reducing swelling in the extremity. Aerobic exercise also combats fatigue, which plagues so many people during and after cancer treatment.

Finally, deep abdominal breathing or diaphragmatic breathing is important with all exercise, but especially so in people with lymphedema. When deep breathing is carried out, the pressure inside the chest and abdomen is altered and creates a pumping activity within the lymphatic system. The central thoracic duct, which carries lymph fluid from the abdomen and legs, travels through the chest cavity. Pumping action around the duct helps to increase lymphatic flow throughout the body. Deep breathing is also important to deliver adequate oxygen supplies to the working muscles so that they may work efficiently.

Exercises should be initiated by a physical or occupational therapist that specializes in lymphedema treatment. As with all exercise, you should discuss beginning a program with your physician.


How Much Weight Can I Lift?

There has been little research to date regarding the intensity of exercise in people with lymphedema and what is a safe level. Previously, intensive exercise was viewed as contraindicated, or not advisable. Currently, exercise and progressive weight lifting activities are used to assist in the removal of lymphedema from the affected areas. Therapists can guide clients in a weight lifting program that is tailored to their present fitness levels. How much you can lift depends on the stage of treatment and most importantly, you previous and present fitness levels. It is important to continuously monitor the limb for swelling or redness, which can be an indication that the exercise was too intense. A weight lifting program should be initiated by a therapist who specializes in the treatment of lymphedema.

Should I Wrap My Arm With Exercise?

It is recommended that the affected limb (arm or leg) be wrapped with compression bandages during exercise to aide the muscle pump force on the venous and lymphatic systems. Wrapping also prevents further fluid from accumulating in the extremity. The bandages used for lymphedema treatment are short-stretch bandages. The short stretch bandages used in lymphedema treatment do not stretch much when applied to the arm or leg. When you exercise the wrapped limb, the muscles and the bandages place a force on the lymphatics that help move fluid out of the arm. ACE bandages stretch too much and are ineffective in the treatment of lymphedema. Do NOT USE Ace wraps when wrapping for lymphedema.

What Exercises Can I do After Breast Surgery?

Following a mastectomy it is important to maintain range of motion or flexibility in the shoulder. Frequently, women decrease the use of the shoulder and arm on the side of the body where surgery was performed due to pain or fear of hurting the incision. Protecting the arm may lead to stiffness and tightness in the shoulder which can make it difficult to move the arm. This is often followed by a loss of muscle strength and stability around the shoulder. Since the shoulder and neck are closely related, it is also important to maintain neck mobility to prevent further complications. Ask your doctor or physical therapist if you have questions about which shoulder exercises are right for you.

If you have recently undergone a mastectomy accompanied by a breast reconstruction REFER TO YOUR SURGEON FOR INFORMATION REGARDING SHOULDER EXERCISE. It is important to discuss beginning an exercise program with your physician.

http://www.oncolink.com/coping/article. ... =39&id=536
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